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Can you ever eat raw chicken?

We thought it might be time to check in with the CSIRO to find out what the recommendations on chicken actually are. There have been many recent and recurring stories about chicken sashimi so we wanted to set the record straight on its safety as a food because there seems to be some disturbing trends on the rise.

So, can you ever eat chicken raw?

 Cathy Moir, Senior Food Microbiologist at the CSIRO, say unequivocally no.

"Chicken should not be eaten raw because it may carry harmful bacteria such as Salmonella and Campylobacter that can result in foodborne infection and gastroenteritis," she says, adding that chicken livers are no different. "There have been outbreaks of Campylobacter food poisoning linked to dishes such as pâté, where poultry liver has been undercooked. Like other poultry meat, livers need to be cooked all the way through to kill bacteria that may be present. Lightly frying the surface is not enough. Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) recommends that cooked whole livers may still be slightly pink in the centre, but they should never be bloody or look raw."

 Ms Moir advises that long, slow, low temperature cooking can be used to cook chicken and still retain a nice blush, but it's a method best left to professionals who have the training and means to know when they are getting it just right. She suggests that the best way to know with certainty that a food like chicken is cooked through is to use an internal thermometer and make sure that the interior temperature is 75°C for chicken.

"Different meats require different cooking temperatures to destroy harmful bacteria. Not only should we cook chicken right through until it reaches an internal temperature of 75°C, the same goes for minced or boned meats, hamburger, stuffed meats, mechanically tenderised meat and sausages. This is because food poisoning bacteria can be present all the way through these types of meat products as well as on the surface and only thorough cooking will kill them. Use a meat thermometer to check temperatures in the thickest part of the meat and always follow cooking instructions on packaged foods."

Simply put, there is no such thing as chicken sashimi, rare chicken or translucent chicken. These should be avoided at all costs.

 

Source : Channel 9 Honey Kitchen, 28 September 2017